Author Talk: Inclusion: How Hawai’i Protected Japanese Americans From Mass Internment with Author Tom Coffman

May 12th, 2022
Author Talk: Inclusion: How Hawai’i Protected Japanese Americans From Mass Internment with Author Tom Coffman

May 12, 2022

Author talk with Tom Coffman on his book Inclusion: How Hawai’i Protected Japanese Americans From Mass Internment, Transformed Itself, and Changed America, about the WWII history of the Hawai’ian islands and the policymakers and local leaders whose decisions prevented the unjust mass incarceration of the Japanese American community experienced by their counterparts on the West Coast of the mainland United States. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on May 12, 2022.

For more information on other programs and events from the JCCCNC, go to: www.jcccnc.org
Event co-sponsored by the National Japanese American Historical Society and the Northern California Western Nevada Pacific District of the Japanese American Citizens League.

Virtual Author Talk: The Eagles of Heart Mountain with Bradford Pearson

November 17th, 2021
Virtual Author Talk: The Eagles of Heart Mountain with Bradford Pearson

November 17, 2021

Virtual author talk with Bradford Pearson on his book The Eagles of Heart Mountain: A True Story of Football, Incarceration, and Resistance in World War II America, about the high school football team of Japanese American camp incarcerees from the Heart Mountain, Wyoming concentration camp who went undefeated in 1943 against the predominately white teams from Wyoming and Montana who they played against. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on November 17, 2021.

Virtual Author Talk: Manga Yokai Stories with Sean Michael Wilson

October 30th, 2021
Virtual Author Talk: Manga Yokai Stories with Sean Michael Wilson
October 30, 2021

Virtual author talk with manga author Sean Michael Wilson on his book Manga Yokai Stories, adapting classic tales of yokai from Japanese folklore from the stories originally gathered and translated by Lafcadio Hearn at the turn of the 20th century.. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on October 30, 2021.

For more on Sean Michael Wilson, go to: https://seanmichaelwilson.weebly.com

Tadaima 2021 Author Talk – Japanese American Newspapers Before, During and After WWII & Civil Rights Activist Sei Fujii

September 20th, 2021

Tadaima 2021 Panel Discussion – Japanese American Newspapers Before, During and After WWII & Civil Rights Activist Sei Fujii

September 20, 2021

Tadaima 2021 panel discussion on Japanese American newspapers and issei civil rights pioneer Sei Fujii. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on Fridayay, September 20, 2021.

Join us for an online author talk and speaker’s panel as part of this year’s community-wide Tadaima virtual pilgrimage lineup of daily virtual programs on the Japanese American WWII incarceration with Brian Niiya, Ellen Endo, Bill Watanabe and Jeffrey Gee Chin, author of the forthcoming book, A Rebel’s Outcry: Biography of Issei Civil Rights Leader Sei Fujii (1882-1954), published by the Little Tokyo Historical Society. Japanese American periodicals have played a critical role in informing and representing the community before, during, and after WWII. In times when the Nikkei community was silenced by racially-biased laws and incarceration, periodicals provided the opportunity to have their voices heard. This program explores the nuances of this representation, and the role of the press back then as well as its impact today. Selected discussion topic is the life and legacy of Sei Fujii, Issei civil rights activist and founder of the bilingual Kashu Mainichi (The Japan California Daily News). Panelists include Brian Niiya, Ellen Endo, Bill Watanabe, and Jeffrey Gee Chin, moderated by Denise Dador.

Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP) and Tadaima

Stay up to date with more projects from Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP), like Tadaima! on their website and social media!

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxj0…
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Mailing List: 
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Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/jampilgrimages

Tadaima 2021 Author Talk: When Can We Go Back To America? with Susan H. Kamei

September 14th, 2021

Tadaima 2021 Author Talk: When Can We Go Back To America? with Susan H. Kamei

September 12, 2021

Tadaima 2021 author talk with Susan H. Kamei, author of When Can We Go Back To America?  Voices of Japanese American Incarceration During WWII. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on Tuesday, September 14, 2021.

Join us for an online author talk as part of this year’s community-wide Tadaima virtual pilgrimage lineup of daily virtual programs on the Japanese American WWII incarceration with Susan H. Kamei, author of the new book, When Can We Go Back to America? Voices of Japanese American Incarceration During World War II (Simon & Schuster 2021). In the book, the voices of those who lived through this experience—many of them children, teenagers, and young adults who were US citizens—illuminate the frightening reality and enduring tragedy of this dark period in American history. Through their stories, you will confront how and why an unconstitutional, large-scale, racially-based incarceration occurred in our country founded on principles of justice and freedom. Those incarcerated included members of Susan’s family. Her mother and her parents were imprisoned at the Santa Anita Assembly Center in Arcadia, California, and then at the Heart Mountain War Relocation Center near Cody, Wyoming. Her father, his grandparents, parents, and siblings spent the war years in the Poston II Relocation Center in Poston, Arizona. Susan was a volunteer leader in the campaign for the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 that acknowledged these wrongful actions and provided token reparation payments to the survivors of the wartime detention. She continues her commitment to educating the public about this shameful episode in our country’s history and to creating greater awareness of why our civil liberties need to be protected now more than ever.

Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP) and Tadaima

Stay up to date with more projects from Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP), like Tadaima! on their website and social media!

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxj0…
Website:
https://www.jampilgrimages.com
Twitter:
http://twitter.com/jampilgrimages
Instagram:
http://instagram.com/jampilgrimages
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/JAMPilgrimages/
Mailing List:
https://jampilgrimages.us18.list-mana…
Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/jampilgrimages

Tadaima 2021 Author Talk – Becoming Nisei: Japanese American Urban Lives in Prewar Tacoma

September 10th, 2021

Tadaima 2021 Author Talk – Becoming Nisei: Japanese American Urban Lives in Prewar Tacoma

September 10, 2021

Tadaima 2021 author talk with Dr. Lisa M. Hoffman and Dr. Mary L. Hanneman, authors of Becoming Nisei: Japanese American Urban Lives in Prewar Tacoma. Moderated by Greg Tanbara. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on Fridayay, September 10, 2021.

About Author Dr. Lisa M. Hoffman: Lisa Hoffman came to UW Tacoma in the fall of 2002. She received her BA in Philosophy from Yale University (1988), her MA in China Regional Studies from UW Seattle’s Jackson School of International Studies (1992) and her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at UC Berkeley (2000). She defines her interdisciplinary and yet anthropological work as anthropology of the urban. Broadly speaking, her scholarship has focused on questions of power, governing and social change, with a particular interest in subjectivity. Geographically, the majority of her work has been located in urban China, with an extension of these organizing questions into other realms in the United States, such as homelessness, ethnic identity, and the molecularization of life. Her analytical approach has been strongly influenced by the work of Michel Foucault – especially in terms of how she thinks about power, technologies of governing, and subject formation processes. In all research projects, she examines practices, techniques, and mechanisms of governing that are not confined to institutional or sovereign spaces. In addition, her scholarship continues to ask questions about the mutual constitution of spatiality and subjectivity, whether in global city-building, second-generation Japanese American urban identity, or relationships between biomedical ecosystems and “local cultures.”

About Author Dr. Mary L. Hanneman Dr. Mary Hanneman earned her Ph.D. in Modern Japanese History from the University of Washington Seattle. Dr. Hanneman’s dissertation focus involved looking at pre-WWII political nationalism in Japan; Dr. Hanneman’s research interests continue in this area and have branched out into looking at comparative nationalisms and issues of national identity, with teaching focus on modern East Asia, where she teaches upper and lower division courses on modern Japan, China and Korea. One of her favorite courses to teach is about WWII in Asia, “The Pacific War,” which she enjoys teaching because it provides such an intersection of the histories and experiences of the East Asian countries. Dr. Hanneman has also been involved in running a summer study abroad program in China for nearly the past decade.

Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP) and Tadaima

Stay up to date with more projects from Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages (JAMP), like Tadaima! on their website and social media!

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxj0…
Website: 
https://www.jampilgrimages.com
Twitter: 
http://twitter.com/jampilgrimages
Instagram: 
http://instagram.com/jampilgrimages
Facebook: 
https://www.facebook.com/JAMPilgrimages/
Mailing List: 
https://jampilgrimages.us18.list-mana…
Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/jampilgrimages

Virtual Author Talk: Exploring Japan’s Undiscovered Treasures with Phil Lee author of Cultural Kaiseki: A Journey Through Offbeat Japan

August 13th, 2021

Virtual Author Talk: Exploring Japan’s Undiscovered Treasures with Phil Lee author of Cultural Kaiseki: A Journey Through Offbeat Japan

August 13, 2021

Author talk with Phil Lee on his travel book Cultural Kaiseki: A Journey Through Offbeat Japan. Recorded by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California on August 13th, 2021.

For more information on Phil’s book, go to: https://culturalkaiseki.com/
Instagram: @Cultural_Kaiseki, https://www.instagram.com/cultural_kaiseki/
Youtube: Adventures with Phil –  https://www.youtube.com/user/shoplee1

 

Author Talk – The Minamata Story: An EcoTragedy with Manga Author Sean Michael Wilson

July 26th, 2021

Author Talk – The Minamata Story An EcoTragedy with Manga Author Sean Michael Wilson

July 26, 2021

Watch our recording of our Author Talk with manga author Sean Michael Wilson as he presents his book The Minamata Story: An EcoTragedy, based on the true events surrounding Minamata disease, a man-made neurological disease caused by mercury poisoning from industrial pollution in the seawaters that affected the Japanese fishing village of Minamata and other coastal towns in the 1950’s. Recorded by the Center on July 26, 2021.

For more information on The Minamata Story and Sean’s other published works, go to: https://seanmichaelwilson.weebly.com

For more information of the Center’s programs and activities, go to: www.jcccnc.org

 

Japantown History Series with Dr. Meredith Oda: Japanese Americans and African Americans in Western Addition Redevelopment

May 20th, 2021

Japantown History Series with Dr. Meredith Oda: Japanese Americans and African Americans in Western Addition Redevelopment

May 20, 2021

Co-Sponsored by the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS)
Order Books Online: http://bit.ly/jtownhistorybook

The Center and the National Japanese American Historical Society are pleased to present a two-part lecture series on the history of San Francisco Japantown with historian Dr. Meredith Oda. These lectures will be based on Dr. Oda’s research and writings in her book, The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco. Join us for an enlightening lecture and audience Q&A, and uncover insights to our community’s post-WWII past.

Japantown History Series – Lecture No. 2: Japanese Americans and African Americans in Western Addition Redevelopment

This talk will explore the contrasting ways that redevelopment portrayed San Francisco Japanese Americans and African Americans, despite the quite similar ways in which both groups sought to carve out places for themselves in their discriminatory city. We’ll look at examples of Japanese American and Black cooperation and conflict with city officials (CANE, WACO, Nihonmachi Community Development Corporation, Fillmore Community Development Corporation) to see how redevelopment and city relations help to cast the two populations in opposing frames, despite the commonalities in tactics and overarching goals. 

Praise for The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco

  ORDER BOOKS ONLINE

The American Historical Review:
The Gateway to the Pacific is a superb work of urban, social, Japanese American, and transpacific history. . . . It is an excellent example of how a local history serves as a window into national and global dynamics.”

California History:
“The value of this work is greatly enhanced by the author’s voluminous original research in conducting her study, including letters, newspaper and magazine articles, archival municipal evidence, records of interviews by and about major figures, and records of city missions toJapan. The vast quantity of pertinent primary materials uncovered permits the author to demonstrate the step-by-step evolution of the relationship between San Francisco and Japan and the critical role that Japanese Americans played in this process.”

 

About Dr. Meredith Oda:

Meredith Oda is Associate Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno. Originally from Philadelphia, she lived in the Bay Area for ten years, attending UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree and working at the National Japanese American Historical Society in Japantown after college. She then received her doctorate from the University of Chicago and has had fellowships and grants from the Huntington Library, the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago, and the University of Nevada, Reno. Her research and teaching focus on Asian American history, urban history, US-East Asian relations, and the U.S. in the world. Her first book, The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco (Chicago, 2018), is a transpacific urban history of San Francisco. Her current book project looks at alienage, mobility, and Japanese American resettlement from the WWII incarceration camps until the 1952 Walter-McCarran Immigration and Nationality Act.

Japantown History Series with Dr. Meredith Oda: Japan and San Francisco During the Early Cold War

April 22nd, 2021

Japantown History Series with Dr. Meredith Oda: Japan and San Francisco During the Early Cold War

April 22, 2021

Co-Sponsored by the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS)
Order Books Online: http://bit.ly/jtownhistorybook

The Center and the National Japanese American Historical Society are pleased to present a two-part lecture series on the history of San Francisco Japantown with historian Dr. Meredith Oda. These lectures will be based on Dr. Oda’s research and writings in her book, The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco. Join us for an enlightening lecture and audience Q&A, and uncover insights to our community’s post-WWII past.

Japantown History Series – Lecture No. 1: Japan and San Francisco During the Early Cold War

Civic leaders and ordinary people from all walks of life in San Francisco cultivated and celebrated their city’s ties with Japan almost immediately after the Pacific War ended, most notably with the construction of the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center in the Japantown neighborhood. This talk will explore the city’s many economic, civic, and cultural relations with Japan, and the ways that the recent enemy became central to postwar San Francisco’s civic identity. We’ll look at examples such as the now-defunct sister-city relationship, the precursor to the Asian Art Museum, Japanese restaurants, Japanese food imports, and the role of Japanese Americans in these transpacific relations. 

Praise for The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco

  ORDER BOOKS ONLINE

The American Historical Review:
The Gateway to the Pacific is a superb work of urban, social, Japanese American, and transpacific history. . . . It is an excellent example of how a local history serves as a window into national and global dynamics.”

California History:
“The value of this work is greatly enhanced by the author’s voluminous original research in conducting her study, including letters, newspaper and magazine articles, archival municipal evidence, records of interviews by and about major figures, and records of city missions toJapan. The vast quantity of pertinent primary materials uncovered permits the author to demonstrate the step-by-step evolution of the relationship between San Francisco and Japan and the critical role that Japanese Americans played in this process.”

 

About Dr. Meredith Oda:

Meredith Oda is Associate Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno. Originally from Philadelphia, she lived in the Bay Area for ten years, attending UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree and working at the National Japanese American Historical Society in Japantown after college. She then received her doctorate from the University of Chicago and has had fellowships and grants from the Huntington Library, the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago, and the University of Nevada, Reno. Her research and teaching focus on Asian American history, urban history, US-East Asian relations, and the U.S. in the world. Her first book, The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco (Chicago, 2018), is a transpacific urban history of San Francisco. Her current book project looks at alienage, mobility, and Japanese American resettlement from the WWII incarceration camps until the 1952 Walter-McCarran Immigration and Nationality Act.